Women in munitions factories

Create a short performance, which depicts the 'life of a young woman entering the world of work' for the first time during WWII. Your performance should be no longer than 3 minutes long. You can create a monologue meaning you perform the piece on your own or you can perform with others smaller groups are better.

Women in munitions factories

Munitions work was often well-paid but involved long hours, sometimes up to seven days a week. Workers were also at serious risk from accidents with dangerous machinery or when working with highly explosive material.

In one building 19 workers, mainly women, were filling trays of anti-tank mine fuses when one of the fuses exploded, setting off the rest of the fuses in the tray.

Women in munitions factories

The Daily Telegraph reported what happened next: The girl working on that tray was killed outright and her body disintegrated; two girls standing behind her were partly shielded from the blast by her body, but both were seriously injured, one fatally.

The factory was badly damaged: Some munitions workers handled toxic chemicals every day. You were put into what they called small shops where they made different sizes of shells and landmines and different things like that…you were just told what you had to do, filling them with TNT.

And there was a lot involved in doing them, and they had to be filled to a certain level and then you had to put a tube in which was going to contain the detonator. Then it had to be all cleaned and scraped until it was exactly the right height inside the shells or the mines.

It was quite heavy work actually because they used to have like a big cement mixer, type of thing and this was hot TNT. The smell was terrible and you had to go to that with something like a watering can, and take it up. There was a chap on it who used to tilt it and fill your big can, and you'd have to carry that to where you were working and then fill the shells from that.

I slipped on the floor with one of these big cans and I was covered in TNT.

Women in munitions factories

My eyes were concealed and everything, up my nose, it was everywhere. Some of the chaps that were working there got hold of me and put me onto a trolley and took me down to the medical place and obviously I had to wait for it to set on my face. I had quite a job getting it off my eyelashes, you know and that sort of thing.

World War I: | Striking Women

And of course my face then was red and scarred with the hot TNT, you know. They put me on the bed for an hour or something, and then it was straight back to work after that.

Quoted on the Liverpool Museums website Discussion Ideas What reasons do you think munitions workers might have had for choosing this type of war work? What do you think working on a production line might have been like?

Stories of accidents at munitions factories were not always reported in the press. Why might this have been? Gwen Thomas went to rest 'for an hour' after her accident and then went straight back to work.

How do you think attitudes to health and safety have changed?

Munitions Factories in WW2 – ‘Canary Girls’

Activity Ideas Analysing sources: Look at the photograph above of women working on a production line in a factory in the East Midlands during World War Two.More than , women became employed in munitions factories and performed other roles such as working as bus conductors or farm hands.

Then, in , the right to vote was given to 'respectable. More than , women became employed in munitions factories and performed other roles such as working as bus conductors or farm hands. Then, in , the right to vote was given to 'respectable.

Approximately 1,, women joined the workforce between and in Government departments, public transport, the post office, as clerks in business, as land workers and in factories, especially in the dangerous munitions factories, which were employing , women by Armistice Day (as compared to , in Germany).

Between and , hundreds of British factories altered their functions to make munitions. Over , women – teenagers, wives, mothers, even grandmothers – joined the two million already working in .

Women Working in a WW2 Munitions Factory In February there was a serious accident at the Royal Ordnance Factory in Kirby, Lancashire.

‘Canary Girls’ and ‘Munitionettes’ • Female Munitions Workers in WW1 • MyLearning

In one building 19 workers, mainly women, were filling trays of anti-tank mine fuses when one of the fuses exploded, setting off the rest of the fuses in the tray. Thousands of women volunteered as a result, and many of these were soon employed in the growing number of munitions factories across the country.

By the end of the war, over , – and possibly up to one million – women had become ‘munitionettes’.

Filling Factories in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia